Archive for the Curiosities category

Answer our survey on the publication of digital scores and take part in a competition at the same time!

Posted by Soledad Sánchez Bueno on March 25, 2014  |  Leave a comment

Finishing April 30, you have a chance to win five albums on the Tritó label (to be chosen by the winner) by answering a survey we have prepared for all our musician friends, researchers and music lovers – in fact, for all of you.

If you think the world of music publishing needs to innovate by offering new formats or even if you don’t agree with this idea, we would like you to answer some questions whose answers will help us decide the way forward.

Take part in the survey and invite all your friends to as well!

You can directly access the survey here. At the end you will be asked for your email or phone number so that we can contact you if you turn out to be the winner.

Thanks in advance for helping us to grow!

Download your music from the Tritó website

Posted by Soledad Sánchez Bueno on June 12, 2013  |  Leave a comment

The more curious of you, who follow our every move, will no doubt have noticed that we have made some changes to our website. But in case you’ve lost track we’d like to tell you a little bit about some of these changes.

We have added a player so that you can listen to digital music albums directly off the web. And the player is linked to the various digital stores where you can buy music in high quality digital format (WAV).

Furthermore, we decided that our website needed a soundtrack. What could be better than music composed and performed by our composers and musicians?

As if this were not enough, we have added a button so that you can choose which store or platform you want to download our audio tracks from. Besides the most popular stores such as iTunes, Amazon and Deezer there are many others serving countries all over the world.

Furthermore, we decided that our website needed a soundtrack. What could be better than music composed and performed by our composers and musicians?

And finally we’ve done it! We wanted to share and invite you to explore our digital catalogue and it’s now available.

In the near future we hope to offer special promotions to our newsletter subscribers and all our unconditional friends who help disseminate the work we do every day.

Start enjoying Tritó’s digital music now!

Ramon Carnicer, Rossini and the guitar

Posted by Soledad Sánchez Bueno on March 4, 2013  |  Leave a comment

Some months ago we published a volume that includes four versions for guitar of the overture that Ramon Carnicer (1789-1855) created for the opera of Rossini, Il barbiere di Siviglia.

In the prologue of the edition, thoroughly written by Josep Dolcet and Josep Maria Mangado, alluded the transcendence the scenic pieces of Ramon Carnicer had. Starting his education as a clerical musician, he started composing arrangements and editions of some scores he conducted. As expected, the audience wanted new pieces of music.

Motivated by this demand and his own capacity to experience, Carnicer composed a new overture for Il barbiere di Siviglia -very known by the audience- that resulted, even for the original composer, Rossini, better than the real overture.

The popularity some opera pieces achieved during the 19th century in Europe, made place to new versions and adaptations of the famous fragments for different instruments, such as the guitar, the piano or the little ensembles. Apparently, there exist some adaptations for guitar of Carnicer’s overture.

In this edition made by Tritó, there are included a version from 2007 by Josep María Mangado and three more facsimile editions from 19th century. The first one -version by Pelegrí- was originally published in Barcelona, from 1819. The second version, anonymous, was published in Madrid, by Manuel Carrafa’s press. The last one, by Tomás Damaz, was also published in Madrid, the 1872 by Antonio Romero.

Thanks to the intensive musicological work developed around these editions, today we have this volume that will allow guitarists, researchers and curious to compare and choose the adaptation that fits better with their interests. Our editorial team wishes to share with you, our followers, the enthusiasm with which we carried this edition, and hopes to arouse your interest.

Pepita Jiménez in Argentina

Posted by Soledad Sánchez Bueno on October 11, 2012  |  5 Comments

Two versions of the opera Pepita Jiménez (Isaac Albéniz) are included in TRITÓ’s catalogue . The original English libretto was written by Francis Money-Coutts which and was based on a novel by Juan Valera.

In our first edition, the editor, José de Eusebio, worked with the third version from 1904 . The second version was edited by Borja Mariño who worked with the second version from 1896 (premiered in Prague).

On next October 28 th, the Teatro Argentino de la Plata will host three premieres: the American premiere of Pepita Jiménez, the world premiere of our second edition and the first performance in Argentina of a staging by Calixto Bieito.

The musical conductor will be Manuel Coves and the cast is formed by Nicola Beller Carbone conform, Enrique Ferrer, Adriana Mastrángelo, Victor Torres, Jose Antonio Garcia, Sebastian Angulegui, Francisco and Juan Pablo Labourdette Bugallo with the Coro y orquesta estables del Teatro Argentino.

The Argentinian premiere of Pepita Jiménez Argentina is possible thanks to the collaboration of Teatros del Canal (Madrid) and the Teatro Argentino de la Plata.

We look forward to receive good news from the Argentinian premiere of one of the most unknown and best scenycal works by Albeniz.

The Swiss label VDE-Gallo on TRITÓ

Posted by Soledad Sánchez Bueno on June 14, 2012  |  Leave a comment

The Swiss label VDE-Gallo is a small company specialized in woed music.

Its catalog also includes other titles of interest to our country as the CDs rcorded by the Catalan pianist Esther Pineda.
She is planning to offer two concerts related to her CD with music by Frederic Mompou that will be place the Conservatoire Jean-Philippe Rameau and the Théâtre du Châtelet (Grand Foyer).
On of the other most interesting titles on the label, is a collection of organ music played on organs from Philippines by the organist Guy Bovet.
Of great interest ethnomusicological and for fans of the label Ocora specialized in ethnic music, VDE-Gallo offers an interesting series of Latin American music titles.
A strong recovery effort can not go unnoticed. We hope this collection offered by the Swiss label is of your interest.

Bobby McFerrin hacks your brain with music

Posted by Marcel Soleda on August 26, 2011  |  1 Comment

Still rummaging through de musical chest in Youtube we discover Bobby McFerrin leaving us gobsmacked in this fun, 3-min performance from the 2009 World Science Festival. He uses the pentatonic scale to reveal one surprising result of the way our brains are wired. Who said that music is not a universal language? :-)

Capilla del Sol: Latin-American colonial music is no longer in danger

Posted by Soledad Sánchez Bueno on August 25, 2011  |  Leave a comment

Como pudieran en cualquier catedralThe growing interest in the revival and new performance of the Latin American colonial repertoire is illustrated by the recent proliferation of recordings. Despite the difficulties encountered in accessing reliable versions of this repertoire, there are plenty of ensembles that have worked directly with the sources to make recordings.

Until just over five years it would have been hard to find two hundred CDs of colonial music, most of it of poor technical and musical quality, or taking a more modern approach that was too general. But this does not detract from the merit of these performers and researchers, who initiated and promoted the appearance of more rigorous groups. While it was common then to choose a varied repertoire without any particular logic, we now find it somewhat more difficult to accept lay, missionary, cathedral and parish repertoires in the same collection, furthermore originating in latitudes and altitudes thousands of miles apart and composed by anonymous or known composers such as Zipoli, Salazar, Padilla Gutierrez, Ceruti, Juan de Araujo, Sumaya, Torrejón y Velasco and Esteban Salas (just to mention a few).

But something is changing. Specialisation and the expectations of the public require performances better adjusted to the context in which the works arose, better prepared and, above all, better performed.

If we go back a decade we find that the growing awareness of the existence of a vast repertoire as yet undiscovered by the recording labels led to the emergence of some projects that have lasted until today. Although highly questionable in concept and of barely acceptable quality, it is worth recalling the work carried out by the Repsol YPF programme for Music of Latin America, which began in 1998 with the release of a box set with several titles with music from Cuba, Argentina, Guatemala, Ecuador, Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Venezuela, Panama, Mexico and Brazil.

Similarly the French label K.617 has released, as part of its Baroque Latin-American series, approximately forty monographic albums of colonial music. In this collection, the consistency of the criteria used to prepare the different albums is worthy of note.

In 2005 Bolivian Baroque released its first album, recorded by the Ensemble Florilegium led by Ashley Salomon, fruit of Piotr Nawrot’s research and publications. They have released three recordings so far, which display a certain tendency towards the creation of a stereotyped product with a Eurocentric treatment. Lamentably, the quality of the music has declined from the first album to the latest.

Recently, I was surprised by the quality of the music on a recording released by the Ensemble Caprice from Canada under the direction of Matthias Maute. However, once again, the choice of repertoire does not seem to follow any kind of logic that links the pieces together, apart from the mere fact of all coming from Latin America. Furthermore, it does not avoid the clichéd and idealised versioning of the repertoire, where the music has to grab the attention and possess obvious “Latin-American” traits.

Following in the footsteps of pioneers such as Robert Stevenson and Curt Lange, who initiated the revival of the repertoire and the study of the archives of the colonialist cathedrals, there are now specialists working hard all the world, such as Piotr Nawrot, Geoffrey Baker, Bernardo Illari, Miriam Escudero, Lauro Ayestarán, Dante Andreo and Javier Marín. The results of their research provide data that bring us closer to this music and draw attention to its idiosyncrasies. Some recent groups respect these idiosyncrasies by adapting their performances to the different contexts, periods, styles, genres and languages and by trying to produce more careful versions, though no less novel for being so.

La Capilla del Sol is a consolidated Argentinean ensemble that has taken a critical, unbiased approach to colonial music since its beginnings, in 2004. The musical excellence of its members, supported by the thorough research carried out continuously by its director, Ramiro Albino, has paved the way for several concerts by the group in Latin America. Recently, following a European tour (Slovenia, Czech Republic and Spain) the group received very good reviews.

Keeping a careful eye on the editions, using the original sources and taking a creative approach to performance has resulted in music that is alive and full of interest. By merging their specialized training in early music and the folk repertoire, the members give the group a distinctive sound.

The album titled Como pudieran en cualqueir catedral could never sound monotonous, not even to ears unfamiliar with Latin American colonial music. The contrast between the selected works lies in their functional differences, which are, in turn, reinforced by the musical re-creation. In this case there is a guiding principle that links the pieces: the hypothetical reconstruction of a Mass at the Jesuit Missions of Bolivia.

Emulating the procedure followed in the mission chapels, works were selected from missionary archives, which were then transcribed by the musicologists Piotr Nawrot, Sylvia Leidemann, Enrique Godoy and the director of the group, Ramiro Albino; all pieces that were part of repertoire of the Missions of the Chiquitos and Moxos.

As might be expected, the interpretation and recuperation of the sources in an edition and the preparation of a new version requires specific training. In the case of the reconstruction of the colonial repertoire, the performers run into the difficulty of having to “clothe” the music. Some seemingly simple pieces turn out to be extremely difficult to recreate without deep analysis. Other pieces have only survived as fragments and the musicologists chose to reconstruct the missing parts and use additional documentation to obtain further details on the use and ways of the percussion and other instruments, on the natural register of the voices and on how to adorn the music.

Likewise, they have to imagine its possible hybridization with local rhythms, instruments and ways of playing. One of the good points of this album is that there is no sign of contrivance or of an excess of imagination. Nothing seems arbitrary and at the same time the works are imbued with their own character, which distinguishes them from works with a similar structure and function composed in Europe.

It is a real pleasure to listen to this technically polished, high-level recording, with a quality still difficult to find in CDs of colonial music. The similarity in the timbre of voices and their perfect union, and the naturalness of the instrumental performances, gives the pieces a fresh atmosphere that I consider very appropriate if the aim is to reconstruct the spiritual and symbolic context. There are no clichés that fuel the expectations of the listeners; neither is the discourse simplified to bring it closer to the audience. Quite simply, this is a well thought-out, solidly argued and technically sound product.

Capilla del Sol

I hope this work by the Capilla del Sol is only the first in a series of recordings where we will be able discover other repertoires and the associated new approaches, so that they obtain the international acceptance they deserve. Colonial music is consolidating its place in concert programmes everywhere, seeking to re-establish the cultural bond that has united Europe and America for centuries.

CD “Como pudieran en cualquier catedral”

CAPILLA DEL SOL

Adriana Sansone, Silvina Sadoly, Soledad Molina, Isabel Barrios (sopranos) / Cecilia Pahl (mezzo-soprano) / Paul Tavaglino (alto) / Diego Zorah (tenor) / Alicia Moran, Virginia Llansa (violins) / Maria Jesus Olondriz (cello) / Evar Cativiela (guitar, vihuela) / Federico Ciancio (harp) / Cristina Garcia Banegas (organ) / Eduardo Rodriguez (bassoon) / Sergio Bazán (percussion) / Ramiro Albino (flute and direction)

Buenos Aires, 2010

This CD was produced with no profit motive in mind and its distribution is free.

Benjamin Zander on music and passion

Posted by Marcel Soleda on August 9, 2011  |  Leave a comment

Summer is the best time of the year to rummage through the seemingly bottomless memory chest that is the Internet in order to find some gems of recent years. In this ocasion we think is worth posting the presentation that the English conductor Benjamin Zander did in the 2008 TED edition.

Zander has two infectious passions: classical music, and helping us all realize our untapped love for it — and by extension, our untapped love for all new possibilities, new experiences, new connections. Enjoy.

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Filed under: Curiosities

Riccardo Muti. The Art of Music Conducting

Posted by Marcel Soleda on January 31, 2011  |  2 Comments

Funny and spiring speech by Maestro Riccardo Muti, after receiving the Musician of the Year 2010 Award, of Musical America. He is both witty and wise when describing the difficult art of Music Conducting. You should not miss this.

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